Monday, December 17, 2012

Holiday Dog-Friendly Treat Recipe

Here is a dog-friendly treat recipe that your canine companion is sure to love.
Holiday Dog-Friendly Treat Recipe:
1 cup shredded roasted turkey meat
1/4 cup breadcrumbs
1 large egg, beaten
1/2 sweet potato--baked, skin discarded and potato coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons cranberry sauce

In a medium bowl, combine the turkey and breadcrumbs. Mix gently with your hands, then mix in the egg and sweet potato. Shape into two 1/2-inch-thick patties.
In a medium skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the patties and cook, turning once, until golden-brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate to drain. Top with the cranberry sauce and let your canine enjoy!

Monday, December 10, 2012

Cat-Friendly Treat Recipe

½ cup of hamburger
½ teaspoon shrimp paste (see Asian food section of your local grocery store)
¼ cup shelled shrimp, washed in hot water, and minced
½ teaspoon catnip

Mix shrimp paste with the catnip and then hand work it into the hamburger.
Add minced shrimp to the hamburger mix and make into little meatballs.
These can be fed raw, or baked at 425° F for 10 minutes.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Cats & Car Engines

Have you heard about the danger of car engines for outdoor cats? Our car engines often stay warm for hours after our cars have been shut off, making the perfect warm place for an outdoor cat to sleep. If a car is started while a cat is lying on the engine, the cat could be injured or killed! Always knock on the hood of your car before you start it…you could save a life!

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Antifreeze Dangers

Did you know that antifreeze is poisonous for cats and dogs? Pets may be attracted to the chemical because of its sweet taste and smell, so it’s important to keep it stored out of their reach and wipe up any spills on your driveway or garage floor!

Friday, October 26, 2012

Halloween Pet Safety

It's Halloween night and the door bell is continuously ringing. This may be very frightening to your dog or cat or other pets. You need to have a game plan for them, as well, on Halloween night. Have a room set up for them and keep them behind closed doors during trick-or-treating hours. Have food, water, a toy or two and a litter box if needed all set up for them.

You saw the cutest costume for your pet! Just because you think a certain Halloween costume for your fur person is cute doesn't mean that they will enjoy wearing it! Try it on them in advance and see how they react. If they don't like it, don't force them to wear it.

If you own a cat and let it go outside, remember that this a bad time of year for cats. Vicious people tend to find Halloween an excuse to hurt or kill them. Keep them inside for a few days and nights. While they may whine a bit because they are used to going outside, they'll be safer in the house where you can keep an eye on them. There's no need for a pet to run free anyway, keep it home where it's safe all year long.

Having an adult party? Remember, dogs, cats, birds and other animals do not like being intoxicated. Some people at the party may think it's funny to get an animal drunk or high but it can kill them. It's better to hurt someone's feelings by telling them to leave the party than to deal with a seriously ill beloved pet.

Here are some tips to keep your pets happy on Halloween.
As much as your dog or cat may beg for some of your Halloween candy, always remember that chocolate is deadly to them in any amount. There's a chemical that naturally occurs in chocolate that they can not tolerate.
If you work in a pet store, remember that this is the time of year that can be deadly for black cats. Some sick people who play at being what they'll call a Satanist will buy them to "sacrifice" If you can, don't take any black cats or sell them during October. Many pet stores won't take them anyway, just for this reason.
The wrappers, such as tin foil, can get stuck in your pets digestive tract and make them ill or cause death. There are plenty of recipes for making home made dog and cat treats, you can always make them on a Halloween theme if you want to make something special for your pet.
Large dogs can have lethal tails when it comes to wagging them. I've seen a German Shepherd that we used to have clear a coffee table in two seconds flat when she got excited. Don't leave any lighted candles or Jack-O-Lanterns where they could be knocked over by a swinging tail or by a curious cat. Not only could your pet start a fire but they could severely burn themselves in the process.
If you are going to dress your pet in a costume, keep in mind that unless the dog or cat is extremely receptive to this kind of thing, you could be causing it discomfort and stress. Some animals don't mind at all but others do not want to be bothered with this kind of thing. They'll be under enough stress with the festivities going on outside and people constantly at the door so don't cause them any more stress then you have to. You may love to dress in costume but then, you aren't a dog or a cat. 
If a pet costume comes with a mask, don't use it. While some dogs will love dressing up, they usually aren't too keen on masks. If you do use a mask on your pet, make sure that it's eyes have plenty of room to see and that there is nothing covering it's nose or confining it's mouth.
If you are having a indoor party, make sure that you put your dog or cat in a room where they won't be disturbed. Even if your pet is ultra friendly and doesn't mind loud noises, music and lots of people you should keep them separate for the night. Also, be careful your cat or dog doesn't dart out through the open door as you hand out candy. Best bet is to just put them in a room with some food and water for the night and check on them once in a while to let them know everything is fine.

Friday, September 14, 2012

Autumn Safety Tips

Ah, fall—there's nothing like crisp, cool air, the first months of school and luscious foliage to get you excited for the changing seasons. Your pet, too, is probably welcoming the break from hot, sticky weather. But pet parents, beware—fall is also a time of lurking dangers for our furry friends. From household poisons to cold weather hazards, the season is a minefield! Here are some tips to keep your pet snug and healthy during the autumn months.
  • The use of rodenticides increases in the fall as rodents seek shelter from the cooler temperatures by attempting to move indoors. Rodenticides are highly toxic to pets—if ingested, the results could be fatal. If you must use these products, do so with extreme caution and put them in places inaccessible to your pets. 
  • It's back-to-school time, and those of you with young children know that means stocking up on fun items like glue sticks, pencils and magic markers. These items are considered “low toxicity” to pets, which means they're unlikely to cause serious problems unless large amounts are ingested. However, since gastrointestinal upset and blockages certainly are possible, be sure your children keep their school supplies out of paw's reach. 
  • Training tip: If you and your pooch haven't been active outdoors in a while because of the summer heat, do some remedial recall training. Dogs, like people, get rusty on their skills if they aren't using them. 
  • Fall and spring and are mushroom seasons. While 99% of mushrooms have little or no toxicity, the 1% that are highly toxic (PDF) can cause life-threatening problems in pets. Unfortunately, most of the highly toxic mushrooms are difficult to distinguish from the nontoxic ones, so the best way to keep pets from ingesting poisonous mushrooms is to keep them away from areas where any mushrooms are growing. Contact your veterinarian or theASPCA Animal Poison Control Center immediately if you witness your pet eating a wild mushroom. 
  • In order to generate body heat, pets who exercise heavily outdoors, or who live outdoors, should be given more food during colder seasons. Make sure horses and other outdoor animals have access to clean, fresh water that is not frozen. 
  • Autumn is the season when snakes who are preparing for hibernation may be particularly “grumpy,” increasing the possibility of severe bites to those unlucky pups who find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Pet owners should know what kinds of venomous snakes may be in their environment—and where these snakes are most likely to be found—so they can keep pets out of those areas. 
  • Many people choose fall as the time to change their car's engine coolant. Ethylene glycol-based coolants are highly toxic, so spills should be cleaned up immediately. Consider switching to propylene glycol-based coolants—though they aren't completely nontoxic, they are much less toxic than other engine coolants. 

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Fall Football Gatherings & Pets

Do you like to go to football games or tailgate parties in the fall? If you’re planning on bringing your pet, it’s important to make sure that they’re safe. Picnic foods –such as greasy burgers, sugary desserts, ribs, chicken with bones, and shish-kabob sticks—can be extremely dangerous for your pet if they’re consumed! Also charcoal grills can be easily knocked over by excited or skittish pets, causing injuries. Remember to keep your pet safe and secure while you’re engaging in activities that could be dangerous for them.

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Pets & Camping Safety

Camping with your pet can be a fun adventure, but also a dangerous one! It’s important to be fully prepared for bringing a pet with you into the woods BEFORE you go. Make sure your pet is up-to-date on all parasite prevention, and be sure to pack plenty of food and water. If you’re filtering your water, don’t forget your pet needs filtered water too! And most importantly, check campground rules where you’ll be staying, because some campgrounds don’t allow pets because of the danger of large wild animals, like bears! Make sure you keep your pets and family safe, and have a great trip!

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Over-the-Counter Medications & Pets

Pets are often curious creatures, wanting to check out things around the house. Because of this characteristic, it’s important to always store dangerous substances like medicine far from their reach. Pets have been known to accidentally ingest whole packages of pills and the results are often serious, sometimes fatal. Keep your pet’s safe at home by storing your medicine safely out of their reach.

Monday, July 23, 2012

Pets & Pools

Does your pet like to swim? Many pets enjoy the water and love to jump in the pool on hot summer days. Don’t forget that it’s just as important to supervise your pet while swimming as it is to supervise your children. Pets especially may accidentally swallow pool water while swimming, causing them to consume harmful and sometimes toxic chemicals. Instead of letting your pet swim in your family pool, consider getting them a kiddie pool filled with water for them!

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Prevent your pet from starting fires

Extinguish open flames: Pets are generally curious and will investigate cooking appliances, candles, or even a fire in your fireplace. Ensure your pet is not left unattended around an open flame and make sure to thoroughly extinguish any open flame before leaving your home.

Remove stove knobs: Be sure to remove stove knobs or protect them with covers before leaving the house – a stove or cook top is the number one piece of equipment involved in your pet starting a fire.

Invest in flameless candles: These candles contain a light bulb rather than an open flame, and take the danger out of your pet knocking over a candle. Cats are notorious for starting fires when their tails turn over lit candles.

Beware of water bowls on wooden decks: Do not leave a glass water bowl for your pet outside on a wooden deck. The sun's rays when filtered through the glass and water can actually heat up and ignite the wooden deck beneath it. Choose stainless steel or ceramic bowls instead.

Pet proof the home: Take a walk around your home and look for areas where pets might start fires inadvertently, such as loose wires and other potential hazards.

Keep your pets safe

Keep pets near entrances when away from home: When leaving pets home alone, keep them in areas or rooms near entrances where firefighters can easily find them.

Secure young pets: Especially with young puppies, keep them confined away from potential fire-starting hazards when you are away from home, such as in crates or behind baby gates in secure areas.

Practice escape routes with pets: Keep collars and leashes at the ready in case you have to evacuate quickly with your pet or firefighters need to rescue your pet.

Consider using monitored smoke detection services: As an added layer of protection beyond battery-operated smoke alarms, smoke detectors connected to a monitoring center help save pets who can't escape when left home alone.

Affix a pet alert window cling: Write down the number of pets inside your house and attach the static cling to a front window. This critical information saves rescuers time when locating your pets. Make sure to keep the number of pets listed on them updated.

Monday, July 2, 2012

Keeping Cool

                                              Comfy dog for those hot dog days of summer!

Friday, June 29, 2012

Ear Plugs

Studies have shown that dogs are capable of perceiving frequencies about twice that of a normal human and can pick up and distinguish sounds roughly four times that of humans. This means that dogs can hear many sounds on frequencies that humans cannot even begin to detect and what a human can hear at 20 feet a dog can hear at roughly 80 feet.  Remember that with the upcoming holiday!

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Deadly Heat

A car with all four windows cracked will reach over 120F on a 90 degree day and that is if the car is parked in the shade!  Help your pet out, leave them at home.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

New Website Design

We have a newly created website!  Take a look at!
We will strive with the utmost honesty, integrity, and compassion to provide our clients and their pets with the leading edge of medicine in combination with devoted care, in a constant effort to exceed their expectations. We will treat all pets as if they were are own. We will recognize our limitations and be true to our own abilities. We will constantly strive to better ourselves in a continuing effort to provide only the best possible care for our clients and their pets.

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

World Pet Memorial Day

Today is World Pet Memorial Day. The benefits of having pets are too numerous to count. They are our companions, our friends, and to some they are even considered family, but the one downfall of being a pet owner is that a vast majority of pets have a much shorter lifespan than their human companions. Today is a day to remember those departed pets and celebrate the time you had with them. What is the happiest memory you have of a departed pet?

Monday, June 11, 2012

Pet Appreciation Week

It's Pet Appreciation Week! This is a week to celebrate the furry (or scaly or feathered) friends in our lives. Take the time to celebrate your pet and the human-animal relationship you share this week!

Monday, June 4, 2012

Top 10 Things To Do Before Bringing Home Your New Cat

Congratulations, the cat's out of the bag! You've just entered into a wonderful relationship that's bound to be filled with fun and affection. By starting off on the right foot—that is, by being well-prepared for your new arrival—you can move through that rocky adjustment period most new relationships go through and get right down to the lovin'!

1. Make Sure Everyone In The House Is Prepared To Have A Cat

Talk to your family members before bringing a new cat home. Make sure everyone knows that the fun begins only after kitty feels safe and her needs are met. Once you're sure everyone is ready for feeding, litter changing and grooming, you can divvy up chores among family members so everyone is prepared to care for kitty before she arrives.

2. Do You Know What Your Cat Is Trying To Tell You?

The average cat has a vocabulary of more than 16 different sounds, including purring, howling, hissing and meowing—not to mention a wide-range of playful and serious body language. Taking a glance at our Cat Care section will help you understand your cat's behavior before you're faced with her mysterious cat calls, pouncing and nocturnal romps.

3. Stock Up On Supplies Before Kitty Arrives

Have all of your cat's needs ready so she can get right down to the business of making herself at home. Kitty will need:
  • A litter box and the brand of litter she's been using
  • Food and water bowls and the food she's used to eating
  • A sturdy, rough-textured scratching post—at least three feet high—that allows her to stretch completely while scratching
  • Safe, stimulating toys. Hint: If you give her toys that make noises, you'll know when she's playing.
  • A bed lined with a soft, warm blanket or towel
  • Grooming tools: a high-quality brush and nail clipper are a good start

4. Identity Is Key

Proper identification is a necessity. If your kitty is indoors-only, an ID tag or implanted microchip will help ensure she'll be returned to you if she gets out and can't find her way home. A safety collar with an elastic panel will allow your cat to break loose if the collar gets caught on something. We caution against letting cats outdoors, but if you do—or if a window or door is left open—a safety collar and an ID tag may be what bring your missing cat home.

5. A Room Of One's Own

Choose a low-traffic room your kids and other pets don't frequent—this will be your cat's safe space to sniff, eat, scratch and play while she gets her bearings. Arrange her food and water bowls, bed and litter box—and scatter her toys around. You can even clean off a windowsill for her and have soft music playing. She'll appreciate the chance to feel out her new family from inside her haven.

6. Routine Behavior

Give your cat a little structure to lean on. For the first few weeks, provide him with the same kind of food and feeding schedule he had before living with you—and give him the same brand of litter, too, for a familiar scent and feel on his paws. Later on, if you wish to switch to different products, you can make a slow transition.

7. What's New, Pussycat?

With a whole new life in store for her, Kitty will need some time and space to check out her surroundings and all of her new play things. Give her time alone in her room to get comfortable before you come in to play with her. If you have other pets, it's a good idea to leave your new cat in her own room for a few days will allow the other animals in the house to get used to her sounds and scent. (Hint: Watch from the door to see how she leaves her carrier. Whether she pussyfoots into a dark corner or zooms out into the room, you'll know how she feels about her new surroundings.)

8. Introducing Kitty To The Pack

Go slow at first. A cat may need seven to fourteen days to relax into her new environment. If you have kids, let them introduce themselves one at a time. Hold up on the meet-and-greets with friends, neighbors and relatives until your kitty is eating and eliminating on a normal schedule. If you have other pets, don't let your new addition have free run of the house. This is the territory of the animals who have lived with you already. Allow all of your pets to meet in the new cat's territory—and make sure you're there to supervise.

9. Cat-Proof Your Home

When your cat is ready to explore the rest of her new home (for short excursions at first), be sure to get rid of stray items she might chew on or swallow, like toilet paper, tissues and paper towels. Pens and pencils may need to be kept in drawers. You may also have to tape wires to baseboards and put caps on outlets.
Put away harsh cleaning products, human medications and household poisons, and rehome any houseplants that might be toxic to her. Make sure foods that aren't healthy for a cat's tummy are placed securely out of reach.

10. Visit The Vet Within Her First Week

Last but not least, bring your new feline to a caring veterinarian for a wellness exam within one week after adoption. Make this appointment even before you bring your kitty home.

Monday, May 14, 2012

Dog Saves the Day

Watch this incredible video of a dog leading police to a burning house. It is amazing how animals have the instinct to protect their owners and find creative ways to communicate without speaking. Has your pet ever saved the day?

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Client Relations Specialist: Carah

It is Administrative Assistant's Week! We would like to recognize our favorite Client Relations Specialist, Carah! Carah has been a part of the Pawsitive Pet Care team for almost 3 years. Carah is a wife to Troy and a proud mom to Jack (8 yrs) and Noah (11 yrs). Prior to Pawsitive Pet Care, we had the privilege of partnering with Carah when she worked at Emporium Pet Store. Carah worked and managed the store for 12 years. She joined our team as a Veterinary Assistant and now she is the smiling face you usually see at our Front Desk! Her hobbies include pinball, Tae Kwon Do, hockey and kickboxing. She has 2 fur English Bulldog named Tubby and a 2 pound Chihuahua named Jaseppie. Thanks Carah for everything you do! We love you!

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Pets & Easter Chocolate

Chocolate is delicious to most of us, but for your pet, it's a different story. Chocolate can contain high amounts of fat and methylxanthines (a caffeine-like ingredient), which can cause flu-like symptoms in your pet if eaten. Some of these symptoms could include vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, seizures and in severe cases it can be fatal. Avoid endangering the life of your pet...give them pet-safe treats instead!

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

It's Poison Prevention Week

This week marks the 50th anniversary of Poison Prevention Week, which celebrates five decades of safer homes and saved lives. As pet owners it is recommended to identify potentially poisonous situations around your yard and inside your home, as pets are susceptible to accidental ingestion of potentially dangerous common household items. Click the link for great tips to poison-proof your home, room by room.

Tips to Poison Proof Your Home! Click here!